It May Be Small, But I’m ‘Ghana’ Make a Difference

Conducting research in another country has been rewarding and eye-opening. I have been able to learn so much from the parents, healthcare professionals, and community members I have interviewed. They have shared rich stories about overcoming the challenges of taking care of children with developmental disabilities, heartbreaking tales of neglect and abuse of some of…

I’m ‘Ghana’ Challenge the Status Quo

In Ghana, about 840,000 people live with some form of disability and 25% of them are children under the age of nineteen. Thus, 210,000 children in Ghana live with visual, hearing, physical, emotional, or intellectual disabilities, all of which fall under the category of developmental delays or limits. Research regarding the stigma and misconceptions that…

Nĭ hăo and Adiós: Lifeguarding in China and Nicaragua

This past April, I had the unique opportunity to work as part of back-to-back project teams for the International Lifesaving Association (ISLA) to China and Nicaragua. The projects took me across two completely different continents, time zones, climates, languages and cultures. Amongst the clashing differences between these two communities and my own, we remain united…

Keeping in Touch in Malawi

For the last 8 months, I’ve been running a study using data from Malawi to help explore the effectiveness of global aid. Funding from the Breman Family Fellowship and support from the Institute of Global Health have been key in allowing this research to continue. In July 2017, I traveled with another first-year medical student…

We’re a long way from Ulaanbaatar: Rural Clinics in Mongolia

  One aspect I especially appreciate about global health is having the chance to learn about different health care systems. It is fascinating to compare one country’s health care infrastructure to ours in the U.S, learning about unique strengths and identifying opportunities for growth. I had the privilege of visiting several hospitals in the various…